Basic Example

Basic example for Kitex

Before starting this section, make sure you have the required Pre-knowledge and have completed the Environment Preparation.

Getting the Example Code

  • Click here to download the example code repository directly.
  • Alternatively, you can clone the code repository using git: git clone https://github.com/cloudwego/kitex-examples.git

Running the Example

Running Directly

  1. Navigate to the hello directory inside the example repository:

    cd kitex-examples/hello
    
  2. Run the server code:

    go run .
    
    // Output similar logs indicating successful execution
    2024/01/18 20:35:08.857352 server.go:83: [Info] KITEX: server listen at addr=[::]:8888
    
  3. Open another terminal and run the client code:

    go run ./client
    
    // Output similar logs every second indicating successful execution
    2024/01/18 20:39:59 Response({Message:my request})
    2024/01/18 20:40:00 Response({Message:my request})
    2024/01/18 20:40:01 Response({Message:my request})
    

Running with Docker

  1. Navigate to the example code repository:

    cd kitex-examples
    
  2. Build the Docker image:

    docker build -t kitex-examples .
    
  3. Run the server code:

    docker run --network host kitex-examples ./hello-server
    
    // Output similar logs indicating successful execution
    2024/01/18 12:47:34.712415 server.go:83: [Info] KITEX: server listen at addr=[::]:8888
    
  4. Run the client code:

    docker run --network host kitex-examples ./hello-client
    
    // Output similar logs every second indicating successful execution
    2024/01/18 12:48:20 Response({Message:my request})
    2024/01/18 12:48:21 Response({Message:my request})
    2024/01/18 12:48:22 Response({Message:my request})
    

Congratulations! You have successfully made an RPC call using Kitex.

Adding a New Method

Now that you have successfully run the existing example code, let’s add and run your own implemented method.

Open the hello.thrift file in the hello directory. You will see the following content:

namespace go api

struct Request {
        1: string message
}

struct Response {
        1: string message
}

service Hello {
    Response echo(1: Request req)
}

Now, let’s define a new request and response for the new method, AddRequest and AddResponse, respectively. Add the add method to the Hello service:

namespace go api

struct Request {
    1: string message
}

struct Response {
    1: string message
}

struct AddRequest {
    1: i64 first
    2: i64 second
}

struct AddResponse {
    1: i64 sum
}

service Hello {
    Response echo(1: Request req)
    AddResponse add(1: AddRequest req)
}

Generating New Code

Run the following command to automatically update the code files based on the hello.thrift content using the kitex tool:

kitex -module "github.com/cloudwego/kitex-examples" -service a.b.c hello.thrift

After running the above command, the kitex tool will update the following files:

  1. Update ./handler.go and add a basic implementation of the Add method.
  2. Update ./kitex_gen with the necessary code files required by the framework.

Implementing the Business Logic

After completing the above steps, the ./handler.go file will be automatically updated with a basic implementation of the Add method, similar to the following code:

// Add implements the HelloImpl interface.
func (s *HelloImpl) Add(ctx context.Context, req *api.AddRequest) (resp *api.AddResponse, err error) {
    // TODO: Your code here...
    return
}

This method corresponds to the Add method we added in hello.thrift. All you need to do is add your desired business logic code. For example, to return the sum of the request parameters:

// Add implements the HelloImpl interface.
func (s *HelloImpl) Add(ctx context.Context, req *api.AddRequest) (resp *api.AddResponse, err error) {
    // TODO: Your code here...
    resp = &api.AddResponse{Sum: req.First + req.Second}
    return
}

Adding Client Invocation

Now that the server has the Add method implemented, let’s add a client invocation for the Add method.

In the ./client/main.go file, you will see a for loop similar to the following:

for {
        req := &api.Request{Message: "my request"}
        resp, err := client.Echo(context.Background(), req)
        if err != nil {
                log.Fatal(err)
        }
        log.Println(resp)
        time.Sleep(time.Second)
}

Now let’s add the invocation for the Add method inside the loop:

for {
        req := &api.Request{Message: "my request"}
        resp, err := client.Echo(context.Background(), req)
        if err != nil {
                log.Fatal(err)
        }
        log.Println(resp)
        time.Sleep(time.Second)
        addReq := &api.AddRequest{First: 512, Second: 512}
        addResp, err := client.Add(context.Background(), addReq)
        if err != nil {
                log.Fatal(err)
        }
        log.Println(addResp)
        time.Sleep(time.Second)
}

Running Again

Follow the same steps as before to run the server and client code. If you see output similar to the following, it means the execution was successful:

// Server
2024/01/18 21:07:43.638115 server.go:83: [Info] KITEX: server listen at addr=[::]:8888


// Client
2024/01/18 21:07:52 Response({Message:my request})
2024/01/18 21:07:53 AddResponse({Sum:1024})
2024/01/18 21:07:54 Response({Message:my request})
2024/01/18 21:07:55 AddResponse({Sum:1024})
2024/01/18 21:07:56 Response({Message:my request})
2024/01/18 21:07:57 AddResponse({Sum:1024})

Congratulations! You have completed all the steps to get started with Kitex!


Last modified June 24, 2024 : fix: correct the file path (#1096) (b3fa1a4)